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Why It Took Social Science Years to Correct a Simple Error About ‘Psychoticism’

Causality questions aside, you’re still arguing that according to your data impulsive people who dislike rules are more conservative. Full write up here. (An aside: when the target article was first published, so many of my “sophisticate and rational” friends and academic colleagues predictably revealed their crude confirmation biases via their social media virtue-signaling). confirmation…

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WHY I AM AN ACCOMMODATIONIST AND PROUD OF IT

Michael Ruse in the latest issue of ZYGON The implication is that those of us who think that science and religion can coexist harmoniously are in some sense selling out. The New Atheists have appeared on the scene,and in a classic example of what Freud called the “narcissism of small differences,” while they may hate…

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Clash of the Titans: When the Market and Science Collide

Here is the abstract and the introduction from the volume Experts and Epistemic Monopolies where our paper can be found. Abstract Purpose/problem statement – Two highly successful complex adaptive systems are the Market and Science, each with an inherent tendency toward epistemic imperialism. Of late, science, notably medical science, seems to have become functionally subservient to…

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Oakeshott Zygon Symposium

Check out this symposium from a few years back. INTRODUCTION TO THE SYMPOSIUM (pages 133–137) Leslie Marsh Keywords: category error; creationist science; Stephen Jay Gould; ignoratio elenchi; modality; non-overlapping magisteria; Michael Oakeshott; politics; religion; science Abstract. This paper introduces a symposium discussing Michael Oakeshott’s understanding of the relationship of religion, science and politics. RELIGION AND THE MODE OF…

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Science, the Market and Iterative Knowledge

The second paper co-authored with Dave Hardwick has now been published in Studies in Emergent Order: Abstract: In a recent paper (Hardwick & Marsh, in press) we examine the recent tensions between the two broadly successful spontaneous orders, namely the Market and Science. We argued for an epistemic pluralism, the view that freedom and liberty…