Browse by:

A trick of the tail

It used to be, not that long ago, that though oxtail was one of the cheapest cuts of meat, it was without doubt also one of the tastiest if one was into comfort food (soup and stew) of the slow cooking variety. These days I’m gobsmacked by the high price of oxtail — I’ve seen it being…

A Salt Tasting: How Do They Stack Up?

Mary Murphy offers an overview of some of the good stuff, a world away from the nasty salt that most people are exposed to. I am familiar with A, a version of C, E, F, and H. For A, E, and H we purchased large sacks in Guérandeto to encrust a fish on a BBQ. The Canadian…

Food on the road

I’ve been on a road trip for a month or so and as such have had the opportunity to randomly sample a cross section of food in several states/regions/price ranges/types of eatery and so on. After some sixty meals the dishes that stick out are as follows: A bowl of chili ($5.50) in Butte, MT…

The wonders of the Ethiopian cuisine

These days I have found Ethiopian cuisine to be the most consistently delicious, generous and well-priced than any other. I haven’t been able to find a suitable cookbook yet but here is a series on Ethiopian cooking broadcast on the Israeli Educational Television. While I don’t understand much, it doesn’t matter: it will suffice until I can get my…

Chef’s Table: Season Two

Some seven months ago I noted my appreciation of the first season of Chef’s Table. Having just binged out on the second season I’m pleased to report that the standard of outrageous talent and the commitment of the chefs is as high as the first batch. Jointly and severally, the chefs featured in both seasons are a wonderful…

Paul Prudhomme (1940-2015)

A New Orleans gastronomic titan (and by definition, one of the world’s greatest chefs) has died. He put New Orleans food on the map for me via Keith Floyd, a gastronomic love affair that has continued unabated for almost 30 years. This gentle man was kind enough to sign a table cloth for me from a…