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Tragic Sense Of Life

One doesn’t have to be Catholic, an existentialist, Spanish, nor indeed even a “believer” of any sort, to appreciate Miguel de Unamuno. One only needs an appreciation of a distinctive quality of mind — but that intellectual virtue, what with the prevailing lazy abridgments characteristic of ideologues, usually squawking the loudest — is in short supply…

Divine Embodiment in Philo of Alexandria

Here is a recent paper by a young Philo scholar, Deborah Forger (glad some youngsters are engaging with Philo). And when I say scholar I mean scholar — not to be confused with many who are merely “regurgitation generators” for some trendy ism or other. Though officially listed here behind a paywall, the paper is…

Losing their religion: the priests who turned from God

The ever thoughtful Douglas Murray at Unherd.   “Nobody in the West can be wholly non-Christian,” he says, in a central passage. “You may call yourself non-Christian, but the dreams you dream are still Christian dreams, and you continue to be part of the history of Christianity. That’s your fate. You may consider yourself secular,…

Philo goes “mainstream”

A couple of months ago I took to task the Philo entry in the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. I have just noticed that in the interim a more nuanced entry of Philo has recently appeared in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy — and one that actually cites and acknowledges Runia. Oddly enough, Lévy does not mention E.…

Philo of Alexandria

My copy arrived today. A quick glance at the bibliography, i.e. making sure the work of David Runia is consulted, bodes well. Philo’s creation theology marks an important watershed in Western civilization. Within Judaism he ushers in a more philosophical approach to the creation, which subsequently receives more attention that it had during the Second…