Symposium on Pragmatic Encroachment

Two free discussion papers from EPISTEME 9:1

EMPIRICAL TESTS OF INTEREST-RELATIVE INVARIANTISM
Chandra Sekhar Sripada and Jason Stanley

According to Interest-Relative Invariantism, whether an agent knows that p, or possesses other sorts of epistemic properties or relations, is in part determined by the practical costs of being wrong about p. Recent studies in experimental philosophy have tested the claims of IRI. After critically discussing prior studies, we present the results of our own experiments that provide strong support for IRI. We discuss our results in light of complementary findings by other theorists, and address the challenge posed by a leading intellectualist alternative to our view.

PRAGMATIC ENCROACHMENT: IT’S NOT JUST ABOUT KNOWLEDGE
Jeremy Fantl and Matthew McGrath

There is pragmatic encroachment on some epistemic status just in case whether a proposition has that status for a subject depends not only on the subject’s epistemic position with respect to the proposition, but also on features of the subject’s non-epistemic, practical environment. Discussions of pragmatic encroachment usually focus on knowledge. Here we argue that, barring infallibilism, there is pragmatic encroachment on what is arguably a more fundamental epistemic status – the status a proposition has when it is warranted enough to be a reason one has for believing other things.