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Conversation Piece

Over the past few months I’ve been listening closely to Heathen and haven’t tired of it at all, despite some minor annoyances. Echoing many others, the interesting thing about this album is that Bowie, finally and for once, consistently makes good on closing out the amazing legacy of his golden years (1970-1980). Heathen (see a couple of…

Hitch

Christopher Hitchens, born on this day. See Christopher Buckley’s memoir in The New Yorker and Graydon Carter’s in Vanity Fair. While the virtue-signaling, cowardly and intellectually dishonest academic fetishizes white supremacy, they perversely ignore the infinitely larger and more pressing issue, that of Islamofacism. These regressive academics (many of them Jews) fulfill the role of “useful idiots”, functional to cultural Jihad. Whereas Mein Kampf has 7% of its…

Daniel Dennett’s Science of the Soul

Long write-up in The New Yorker Dennett does not believe that we are “mere things.” He thinks that we have souls, but he is certain that those souls can be explained by science. Andy ClarkCognitive scienceDaniel DennettDavid ChalmersdualismGilbert RyleMaterialismneural correlatesNeurophilosophyneurosciencePhilosophy of mindquineReligion

Meaning and Chaos

Sam Harris and Jordan Peterson take another run at a discussion and the result is far clearer and more satisfying than the first effort (I happen to think that the first podcast was not wasted time at all). Having heard Harris and Weinstein and now Harris and Peterson, I think we would be in for a treat listening…

Lost Tribes of Israel, Blood and History

I’ve been fascinated by Tudor Parfitt’s work for some thirty years. If ever there were someone whose life as an academic had any genuine appeal to me, it would be his. In his pursuit of knowledge for knowledge’s sake he has had a profound effect on the understanding of that paradigm puzzle case of social…

The search goes on

Nick Spencer’s The Evolution of the West: How Christianity Has Shaped Our Values warmly reviewed in The Economist. This theme was one that Walker Percy repeatedly returned to. Lurking everywhere in the secularised West is what he calls a “disenchantment with disenchantment”. People still want more than just freedom and choice. They want to belong, they want community rooted in…