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Williams On Moral Philosophy and Christianity

  Bernard Williams, In the Beginning Was the Deed. Ed. Geoffrey Hawthorn. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2009. After one glass of bourbon, we agreed that our work consisted largely of reminding moral philosophers of truths about human life which are very well known to virtually all adult human beings except moral philosophers. After further glasses…

Indulgent Sympathy and the Impartial Spectator

Cognitive neuroscience is in the midst of what has been called an “affective revolution,” which places empathy at the center of a core set of moral competencies. While empathy has not been without its critics (Bloom, 2013; Prinz, 2011), both the radicals and the reactionaries routinely cite Adam Smith’s The Theory of Moral Sentiments (TMS)…

Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy

Someone has uploaded a reissue of Bernard Williams’ classic book. [m]y conclusion is that the demands of the modern world on ethical thought are unprecedented, and the ideas of rationality embodied in most contemporary moral philosophy cannot meet them; but some extension of ancient thought, greatly modified, might be able to do so. Wanting philosophy…

An Unpublished Note on Christian Morality

I chanced upon the piece below published in Religious Studies 19 (2):175 – 183. F. H. Bradley, An Unpublished Note on Christian Morality, Introduced and edited by Gordon Kendal. At some time between 1907 and 1912, probably very much nearer the earlier date, [1] Bradley produced the first draft of an article on Christian morality. He did this in…