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All The Young Dudes

I’ve probably heard most recorded versions of ATYD but this version by The Rebelles stands out. It’s somewhat quirky inflection comes via the close harmonies and in particular the voice of Phoebe White. Crucially, this version retains the essential spirit of the song and features the man himself, Ian Hunter. Tracie, Ian’s daughter is, surprise surprise,…

Butley

Alan Bates’ performance of a lifetime (and he’s had a few) deliciously embodies Simon Gray’s scathing insider’s perspective into the grim world of humanities academia (already that in 1971). Butley has much in common with Malcolm Lowry’s Under the Volcano insofar as all the action takes place in one day, everything falls apart, and alcohol is part and…

The Mick Ronson Story

Chuffed to finally view The Mick Ronson Story who died on this day 25 years ago. Here is a fair critical review by Michael Bonner in Uncut. I was, as were the many there, very fortunate to have last seen Ronson, unbeknownst to us closing the circle with Ian Hunter and Bowie at the Freddie Mercury memorial…

John Gray on Desert Island Disks

And his first choice, Bowie’s “My Way” — i.e. Life on Mars. Though he came to self-awareness in the ’60s he preferred the harder-edged and more poetic ’70s. His one item: a lifetime’s supply of Marmite. Sound chap. ConservatismDavid BowieHistoryIsaiah Berlinjohn grayKirsty YoungLiberalismLibertarianismmarmitePolitical philosophyprogressstoicism

The Man Who Fell to Earth

Having just seen a fully restored version of this film which I previously had last seen on the big screen at a midnight showing on its release in ’76, I was superficially struck by the prescience of the idea of space travel underwritten by private enterprise. Though Walter and Peter in their forthcoming book, Space…

It’s NOT punk

Damn it man, you say as much — so why mention it? Anyway, at least the “reporter” rightly commemorates this timeless album. Television, along with the Talking Heads, are the only North American talents that could consistently approximate the “philosophical musicality” (for want of a better phrase) of what Bowie was up to at the time…