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The Embedded Epistemologist

I was startled to read, in the 6th edition of a well-known textbook, McCormick on Evidence, that the “reasonable doubt” formula “points to what we are really concerned with, the state of the jury’s mind,” whereas “preponderance of the evidence” and “clear and convincing evidence” “divert attention to the evidence.” This has things exactly backwards:…

Academic Hacks

The pun of the headline was unintended. Anyway, here is a short interview with Susan in Psychology Today — BTW, I highly recommend her Manifesto of a Passionate Moderate. The quote below captures the bind that befalls many humanities academics and is therefore a major driver of their hackery — ostrich-ism: So, in the crudest career terms, yes,…

Mind and Behavior 37:2

The latest issue of JMB is now available. I especially want to bring your attention to the Critical Notice of Susan Haack’s latest book Evidence Matters: Science, Proof, and Truth in the Law reviewed here by Erica Beecher–Monas. Erica Beecher–Monasjournal of mind and behaviorsusan haack

The vanity of cleverness

The deliciously scathing Susan Haack on the “vanity of cleverness“ At dinner the night before I was to give a talk in her department, a young professor solemnly told me that there’s no place for humor in serious philosophy. The serious philosopher must indeed work in earnest–but not in grim earnest. Charles Sanders Peircehumourphilosophical humorPhilosophysusan haack

Does science have all the answers?

The eminently sensible and intellectually honest Susan Haack — an  evidence-based philosopher who rightly rejects the epistemic immodesty characteristic of the prevailing rationalistic arrogance of philosophers and scientists. Philosophy for such folk is about what to think and not about how to think: whatever else might be attributed to liberalism, it has primarily embodied the idea that conceptions…

The Fragmentation of Philosophy, the Road to Reintegration

The always interesting and civilized Susan Haack. “You don’t have an area” she asked, in the incredulous tone in which some people sometimes ask me, “you don’t have a cellphone?” . . . I would urge, first, that philosophers and would-be philosophers heed Locke’s shrewd counsel: that, instead of reading only one kind of book and listening to only…