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Whatever It Turns Out To Be: Oakeshott on Aesthetic Experience

Focusing his analysis on the lengthy “Voice of Poetry” essay, Abel provides a robust defense of Oakeshott’s nonrepresentational and nonpractical conception of art. Critics who suggest that Oakeshott goes too far in severing art from truth and morality fail to grasp that Oakeshott’s fundamental philosophical concern is to identify the differentia of aesthetic experience vis-à-vis…

Experience and its Modes: Reissued

It’s been brought to my attention that Experience and its Modes has been reissued with a preface by Paul Franco — see below. E+M is one of the most influential books across all genres to my thinking not to mention being one of the most entertaining. Dreadful new cover though . . . If you…

Of Love and Politics

Aurelian Craiutu reviews Oakeshott’s Notebooks, 1922-86. I don’t share the view that: If Oakeshott were alive today, he would welcome the fact that “the politics of faith” against which he wrote memorable pages seem to have lost some of its appeal. I think that the centre has not held at all and is at its narrowest band…

Religion and the Mode of Practice in Michael Oakeshott

Here is the intro to Elizabeth’s essay: Michael Oakeshott’s religious view of the world stands behind much of his political and philosophical writing. Yet it is difficult to get a firm grasp on what religion means to Oakeshott. His ideas about it constitute nothing that most people would recognize as religious. He rarely writes about God,…

Oakeshott Symposium on Science and Religion

This is the first of six contributions to a symposium published in Zygon, vol. 44, no. 1 (March 2009). Abstract. This paper introduces a symposium discussing Michael Oakeshott’s understanding of the relationship of religion, science and politics. Essays by Elizabeth Corey, Timothy Fuller, Byron Kaldis, and Corey Abel are followed by a review of Corey’s recent…