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Practical Knowledge: Knowing How To and Knowing That

Until about 2006 I read pretty much everything I could on the knowing-how/knowing-that distinction. Here is one paper that I’ve only recently come across by David Wiggins in Mind. I was very lucky to have Wiggins as a tutor, a most honorable man and an exacting philosopher.     AristotleDavid WigginsEpistemologyGilbert Ryleknowing-that knowing-howMichael Oakeshott

Bernard Williams on on Gilbert Ryle

William review of Ryle’s posthumously published On Thinking. I paste in the text below image in case the free access is withdrawn. BTW, Ryle was born on this day in 1900. He was an exceptionally nice man, friendly, generous, uncondescending, unpretentious, and, for a well-known professional philosopher, startlingly free from vanity. . . . he conveyed a…

Ryle and Oakeshott on the “Knowing-How/Knowing-That” Distinction

According to Robert Grant, Oakeshott only ever communicated with two “official” philosophers, one of which was Ryle:  Oakeshott warmly introduced Ryle, who delivered the annual August Comte Memorial Lecture at the LSE. John. D. Mabbott who read the proofs for On Human Conduct had, years earlier, been the first to recognize Oakeshott’s KH/KT connection with Ryle in his…

Being in the World

Here’s a film that I chanced upon (I haven’t seen it yet). Once upon a time there was a world full of meaning, focused by exemplary figures in the form of gods and heroes, saints and sinners. How did we lose them, or, might they still be around, in the form of modern day masters,…

Know how

Jason Stanley and John Krakauer in the NYT We argue that skilled human activity generally requires the acquisition and manipulation of knowledge, as well as implicit processes that do not depend on propositional knowledge (for example, increased dexterity). It is hard, and perhaps not possible, to forge a theoretically significant distinction between working with one’s hands…

Understanding the Tacit

My chum Steve Turner has a new book out. It has much Oakeshott interest and as many will know Steve has been a longstanding Oakeshott commentator. For me, one of his key articles is “Tradition and Cognitive Science: Oakeshott’s Undoing of the Kantian Mind”, a piece that I reference quite regularly. OK, so the book…