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Adam Smith: 18th Century Polymath

Here is the intro to Roger Frantz’ chapter. ~~~~~~~ Adam Smith (1723-1790) was a polymath with several of his key concepts and theories either having modern counterparts and/or “enjoying” empirical support. Smith wrote about the origin and proper use of language, grammar, the history of astronomy and ancient physics, moral philosophy, music, dance, and poetry,…

Making Visible “the Invisible Hand”: The Mission of Social Simulation

Cristiano Castelfranchi’s interesting article. For more on the invisible hand see Propriety and Prosperity: New Studies on the Philosophy of Adam Smith with the following contributions: Metaphor Made Manifest: Taking Seriously Smith’s ‘Invisible Hand’ by Eugene Heath The ‘Invisible Hand’ Phenomenon in Philosophy and Economics by Gavin Kennedy Instincts and the Invisible Order: The Possibility of…

Adam Smith as a Scottish Philosopher

Below is the intro to Gordon Graham’s chapter. Was Adam Smith a Scottish philosopher? The question seems an odd one. He was a philosopher and he was Scottish. What more could we need to know, in order to arrive at the simple answer ‘yes.’ And in any case, why does it matter? On reflection, however, neither…

Propriety and Prosperity: New Studies on the Philosophy of Adam Smith

Finally available. Adam SmithAustrian SchoolCognitioncomplexityconsciousnessdistributed cognitiondistributed knowledgeemergent orderEpistemologyethicsimpartial spectatorinvisible handmirror neuronsphilosophical psychologyPhilosophy of mindpolitical economyPolitical philosophyPropriety and Prosperity: New Studies on the Philosophy of Adam Smithself-interestsituated cognitionsocial epistemologySpontaneous ordersympathy and benevolenceTheory of Moral SentimentsWealth of Nations

Erasing the Invisible Hand

I’m just about finished reading this unrelenting and fine-grained assault on the concept of the invisible hand. This is one of the most remarkable pieces of scholarship I’ve read in many years whatever its flaws. Samuel is terrier-like with a rag doll! No doubt this book is going to upset many ideologues – and so…