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Daniel Dennett’s Science of the Soul

Long write-up in The New Yorker Dennett does not believe that we are “mere things.” He thinks that we have souls, but he is certain that those souls can be explained by science. Andy ClarkCognitive scienceDaniel DennettDavid ChalmersdualismGilbert RyleMaterialismneural correlatesNeurophilosophyneurosciencePhilosophy of mindquineReligion

Thought Insertion as a Self-Disturbance: An Integration of Predictive Coding and Phenomenological Approaches

My correspondent, the very excellent Aaron Mishara, has just alerted me to his latest freely available coauthored paper in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. For those familiar with Andy Clark’s “Whatever next? predictive brains, situated agents and the future of cognitive science” and Shaun Gallagher’s “Neurocognitive models of schizophrenia: a neurophenomenological critique”  — this article should be…

The father of modern neuroscience

Meet Santiago Ramón y Cajal, an artist, photographer, doctor, bodybuilder, scientist, chess player and publisher. He was also the father of modern neuroscience. Hunched Over a Microscope, He Sketched the Secrets of How the Brain Works. It was Joaquin Fuster who first brought Santiago Ramón y Cajal to my attention. Joaquin FusterneurosciencePhilosophy of mindSantiago Ramón y Cajal

There’s Something About Mary

Galen Strawson revisits Frank Jackson’s thought experiment in a final draft made available here. For those not familiar with this thought experiment, Galen sets it up quickly and clearly. If this line of thought is right, the mistake on both sides is—to repeat—to confuse materialism or physicalism with physics-alism. The mistake is a mistake whether…

The Enactive Approach

Notice too that although the choice of processes under study is more or less arbitrary and subject to the observer’s history, goals, tools, and methods, the topological property unraveled isn’t arbitrary. — The Brains Blog Cognitive scienceenactivismEvan ThompsonExtended MindFrancisco Varelamarvin minskymerleau-pontyPhilosophy of mindsituated cognition