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The father of modern neuroscience

Meet Santiago Ramón y Cajal, an artist, photographer, doctor, bodybuilder, scientist, chess player and publisher. He was also the father of modern neuroscience. Hunched Over a Microscope, He Sketched the Secrets of How the Brain Works. It was Joaquin Fuster who first brought Santiago Ramón y Cajal to my attention. Joaquin FusterneurosciencePhilosophy of mindSantiago Ramón y Cajal

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There’s Something About Mary

Galen Strawson revisits Frank Jackson’s thought experiment in a final draft made available here. For those not familiar with this thought experiment, Galen sets it up quickly and clearly. If this line of thought is right, the mistake on both sides is—to repeat—to confuse materialism or physicalism with physics-alism. The mistake is a mistake whether…

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The Enactive Approach

Notice too that although the choice of processes under study is more or less arbitrary and subject to the observer’s history, goals, tools, and methods, the topological property unraveled isn’t arbitrary. — The Brains Blog Cognitive scienceenactivismEvan ThompsonExtended MindFrancisco Varelamarvin minskymerleau-pontyPhilosophy of mindsituated cognition

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Surfing Uncertainty: Prediction, Action, and the Embodied Mind

Publisher’s blurb: “How is it that thoroughly physical material beings such as ourselves can think, dream, feel, create and understand ideas, theories and concepts? How does mere matter give rise to all these non-material mental states, including consciousness itself? An answer to this central question of our existence is emerging at the busy intersection of…

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Shakespeare: memory and modern cognitive science

Here is someone doing interesting interdisciplinary work as an English don without plying the usual woolly pseudo-inquiry tripe. See article here. distributed cognitionEmbodied cognitionEvelyn TribbleExtended MindExternalismMemoryphilosophical literaturePhilosophy of mindshakespearesituated cognition