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Searching for Meaning with Victor Frankl and Walker Percy

New article in The Linacre. Percy was concerned with spiritual suicide at heart—despair, made explicit to him by Kierkegaard—resembling Victor Frankl’s concern with meaning and the current “existential vacuum” (Desmond 2005). However, the novelist’s theological mooring gave him a stronger platform to map postmodern man’s search for meaning, making him a prime example for physicians…

Herb Simon and Wim Wenders

Here’s an interesting discussion paper that caught my eye. I couldn’t resist a title with Simon and most improbably, Wenders, in it. Ethics is then also involved. As Wenders emphasised, freedom is at risk when the capacity of self-reflection and self-elaboration becomes weaker: when humans are not autonomous in their capacity of thinking and deciding…

The Moviegoer: Reissue

Reissue of Percy’s first novel with an afterword by Paul Elie. (Are there two afterwords? — both Elie and Richard Ford are listed). existentialismnew orleansPaul Eliephilosophical literatureRichard Fordthe moviegoerWalker Percy

Walker Percy, Philosopher (12)

Forthcoming: Walker Percy, Philosopher. Percy on the Allure of Violence and Destruction Brian A. Smith Anxiety concerning the decline and fall of civilization appears throughout Walker Percy’s body of work. Smith argues that what sets Percy’s account of this issue apart from others rests in his preoccupation not so much with depicting actual disaster for what…

Tragic Sense Of Life

One doesn’t have to be Catholic, an existentialist, Spanish, nor indeed even a “believer” of any sort, to appreciate Miguel de Unamuno. One only needs an appreciation of a distinctive quality of mind — but that intellectual virtue, what with the prevailing lazy abridgments characteristic of ideologues, usually squawking the loudest — is in short supply…

Walker Percy, Philosopher (7)

Forthcoming: Walker Percy, Philosopher. Walker Percy’s Intersubjectivity: An Existential Semiotic or 3 + 3 = 4 Rhonda McDonnell Rhonda McDonnell argues that Walker Percy’s self-described “radical anthropology” is properly understood as Existentialist semiotics. The cornerstone of this anthropology is his concept of intersubjectivity, which was developed through his examination of language development in humans, his participation…