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Neuroaesthetics . . .

This from the NYT (h/t to Shannon Selin). We will see . . . but me thinks the results (as with neuroeconomics) will be over-stated. Still, great marketing ploy for the author and his publisher. Check out The Science of Art and Brain and Art. This is a very good culturally informed and salutary article that one…

Mirror neurons, embodied simulation and a second-person approach to mind reading

Here is a handy summary of Vittorio Gallese’s highly influential work. Mirror neurons (MNs) and embodied simulation (ES) Intersubjectivity can be profitably understood if framedwithin a phylogenetic perspective. The discovery of MNs enabled establishing a relation between human intersubjectivity, the inter-individual relations of other animal species and their underpinning neural mechanisms. MNs are motor neurons first…

“Easy” vs “Hard” Problems of Consciousness

Michael Graziano in Aeon Magazine I believe that the easy and the hard problems have gotten switched around. The sheer scale and complexity of the brain’s vast computations makes the easy problem monumentally hard to figure out. How the brain attributes the property of awareness to itself is, by contrast, much easier. If nothing else,…

The Neuroscience of Freedom and Creativity

Earlier this year I trailed Joaquín Fuster’s latest book that he so kindly sent me as an uncorrected galley. I’m pleased to report that the book is now finally available. Not surprisingly, Hayek features in this work. If anyone suitably qualified would like to review this book for The Journal of Mind and Behavior or Cognitive Systems Research, please let me know. Pat Churchland has…

Pat Churchland’s latest

Touching a Nerve. It was a pleasure to attend a series of talks by Pat last year. Below is a filmed record of one of those talks. BrainCognitive neuroscienceCognitive scienceconsciousnessidentitymoralityNeurophilosophyneurosciencePatricia Churchlandphilosophical psychologyPhilosophy of mindtouching a nerve

How to Build a Digital Brain

Jeff Hawkins interview. Here’s what we do inside Grok: we build this 60,000-neuron neural network that emulates a very small part of one layer of the neocortex. It’s about a thousandth the size of a mouse brain and a millionth the size of a human brain. So: not super-intelligent, but we’re using the principle by…