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Luck and Learning to Make the Most of It

Here is Vernon Smith on Fortuna. Vernon very kindly wrote the preface to Propriety and Prosperity: New Studies on the Philosophy of Adam Smith. Some call it luck, others call it Providence, and that points to the mystery of the forces that shape us and that we shape—forces well beyond our comprehension.   Adam SmithBehavioral economicsEconomicsfortunaLuckProvidencesituated cognitionTheory…

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Evolving Norms: Cognitive Perspectives in Economics

This book presents institutional evolution and individual choice as codependent results of behavioral patterns. Drawing on F.A. Hayek’s concepts of cognition and cultural evolution, Teraji demonstrates how the relationship between the sensory and social orders can allow economists to track social norms and their effects on the global economy. He redirects attention from the conventional…

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Commemorating the Centennial of Herbert Simon’s birth

As many Simon aficionado’s will know, this year sees several conferences and publications marking the centenary of his birth. So on this note, yet another plug for Minds, Models and Milieux Commemorating the Centennial of the Birth of Herbert Simon but also to mention some upcoming Herbert Simon Society events (it’s somewhat reassuring given the disrepair of the delusional EU…

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Multiple Equilibria, Bounded Rationality, and the Indeterminacy of Economic Outcomes: Closing the System with Institutional Parameters

The tenth in a series of excerpts from Minds, Models and Milieux: Commemorating the Centennial of the Birth of Herbert Simon. Morris Altman A critical point made by behavioral economists from a wide set of methodological perspectives is that individuals typically do not make decisions that are consistent with conventional economic theoretical norms of rational…

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From Bounded Rationality to Expertise

The ninth in a series of excerpts from Minds, Models and Milieux: Commemorating the Centennial of the Birth of Herbert Simon. Fernand Gobet Introduction Historically, a pervasive assumption in the social sciences, in particular economics, is that humans are perfect rational agents. Having full access to information and enjoying unlimited computational resources, they maximise utility when…

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Towards a Rational Theory of Heuristics

The third in a series of excerpts from Minds, Models and Milieux: Commemorating the Centennial of the Birth of Herbert Simon. Gerd Gigerenzer Herbert Simon left us with an unfinished task: a theory of bounded rationality. Such a theory should make two contributions. For one, it should describe how individuals and institutions actually make decisions. Understanding this process would advance…