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The Private Dirk Bogarde

Dirk Bogarde (along with Klaus Kinski) ranks as one of the two greatest screen actors of the post-War era. I realize that this may be somewhat controversial given what Hollywood (I include the Brit luvvies) take to be its finest. Bogarde was very bright, literate, articulate, dignified, brave, philosophical, had integrity and importantly was very scathing — he…

The Exterminating Angel

In life, as in film, I’ve always been fascinated by repetition. I have yet to come across a decent review of this one of the most powerful of all films made (this despite its flaws). Even Roger Ebert seems to skirt things. If one substitutes the “bourgeois cosmopolitans” with the ruling class of sophisticates that run universities…

A Guide for the Perplexed

No, not  Maimonides but Werner Herzog. Here’s a review in The Telegraph — Herzog is more a wayfarer than a wonderer.  Herzog is a wanderer – on foot, wherever possible – and the sheer amount of information he has gleaned about different corners of the world takes the breath away. Travellers, soldier-poets, artisans, astronauts –…

Werner Herzog

I’ve agreed to review Brad Prager’s The Cinema of Werner Herzog: Aesthetic Ecstasy and Truth for the Journal of Mind & Behavior. As an “art-form” film attracts, at best the juvenile mind, or at worst, the pseudo intellect: Herzog is an island of artistic authenticity and integrity in a sea of vulgarity and schlock. I’m pleased that there now exists a…