David Bowie: Transience and Potentiality

This is one of the better and more interesting academic pieces I’ve come across on Bowie: I suspect there is a cottage industry in the making (I’m currently reading this). In another journal of psychology (I won’t mention the name) a writer offers up the crassest of virtue-signaling tendencies by linking Bowie’s character Thomas Jerome…

Bowie: The Last Five Years and The Last Supper

For those who can’t access BBC player here is (a version?) of the show that has just been broadcast along with a companion piece featuring some of those who worked with him. (For the second time, the first vid has been pulled — just search “Bowie: The Last Five Years” in YouTube and perhaps someone has reposted).…

Mishima and Bowie

To mark two close but significant Bowie dates (8th and 10th January) once again check out Chris O’Leary’s terrific Pushing Ahead of the Dame “Tulmudic”-like blog. The particular entry I want to bring to your attention is this one featuring Mishima’s influence on Bowie, two names I’ve long since appreciated totally independently of each other. Chris explicitly vindicates…

The Radical Individualism of David Bowie

And my brother’s back at home with his Beatles and his Stones We never got it off on that revolution stuff What a drag, too many snags Now I’ve drunk a lot of wine and I’m feeling fine Got to race some cat to bed Oh is that concrete all around Or is it in…

“Second Line” for Bowie

As ugly as a teenage millionaire pretending it’s a whizz kid world You’ll take me aside, and say “Well, David, what shall I do? They wait for me in the hallway” I’ll say “don’t ask me, I don’t know any hallways” But they move in numbers and they’ve got me in a corner I feel…

The Philosophical Bowie

Here is Simon Critchley talking at Cornell. Love Critchley’s scathing take on Bono at about 50 mins in. What Bowie describes is a Büchnerian world of terror. The first line, “Silhouettes and shadows watch the revolution,” describes the languor and disappointment of a post-revolutionary situation. In an allusion to Eddie Cochran’s posthumously released 1960 hit, there…

Bowie’s back

The Economist pretty much captures the bind that Bowie has faced over his career. The man who retains the longest stretch of creativity in rock music (1971-1980) blew it by trying to keep cutting edge. With his genuinely great crooning voice he could have out done Rod Stewart’s American Songbook by a mile, but instead…

Cracked Actor

Sounding ever more familiar? Chris O’Leary writes: It’s one of the most brutal lines Bowie ever wrote: “Forget that I’m fifty, ’cause you just got paid.” While the song basically ends at 1:40, the guitar and harmonica extend the track for four more 12-bar choruses, starting a fifth as the track fades out, suggesting the…

Masayoshi Sukita

Would someone who owns a copy of this book please invite me to their house to see it: I will bring along the finest archival white gloves. And we can’t do it without Bowie’s favourite wine (Mr. Sukita can tell you which one it is). There is a very slight interview with Masayoshi that is being endlessly recycled…